Study of Chinese Classical Text

Study of Chinese Classical Text Master Degree

Feel Free to Ask Questions!

Tel : +8615850513534

E-mail : apply@acasc.cn

  • Application Deadline:2018/06/06
  • Tuition:¥0.00
  • Application Fee:¥800.00
  • Service Fee:¥0.00
School Information

Hunan Normal University is located in Changsha, the capital of Hunan Province, a city of beautiful scenery and outstanding intellectuals. Hunan Normal University has inherited the great tradition of the broad and profound Huxiang Culture and has culti

Find more information on the university website
How To Apply

Applying through ACASC generally takes a few minutes to complete. It takes 5 steps to complete the application.

1. Click “Apply Now” button at the top of the page.

2. Fill in online application form.

3. Upload required documents.

4. Pay the application fee and the ACASC service fee

5. Click “Submit” button.

Important notice: In order to apply, you need to create an account with ACASC.

Strictly speaking, Classical Chinese refers to the written language of the classical period of Chinese literature, from the end of the Spring and Autumn period (early 5th century BC) to the end of the Han Dynasty (220 AD), while Literary Chinese is the form of written Chinese used from the end of the Han Dynasty to the early 20th century, when it was replaced by vernacular written Chinese. It is often also referred to as "Classical Chinese", but sinologists generally distinguish it from the language of the early period. During this period the dialects of China became more and more disparate and thus the Classical written language became less and less representative of thevarieties of Chinese (cf. Classical Latin, which was contemporary to the Han Dynasty, and the Romance languages of Europe). Although authors sought to write in the style of the Classics, the similarity decreased over the centuries due to their imperfect understanding of the older language, the influence of their own speech, and the addition of new words.

This situation, the use of Literary Chinese throughout the Chinese cultural sphere despite the existence of disparate regional vernaculars, is called diglossia. It can be compared to the position of Classical Arabic relative to the various regional vernaculars in Arab lands, or ofLatin in medieval Europe. The Romance languages continued to evolve, influencing Latin texts of the same period, so that by the Middle Ages, Medieval Latin included many usages that would have baffled the Romans. The coexistence of Classical Chinese and the native languages of Japan, Korea and Vietnam can be compared to the use of Latin in nations that natively speak non-Latin-derived Germanic languages or Slavic languages, to the position of Arabic in Persia or the position of the Indic language, Sanskrit, in South India and Southeast Asia. However, the non-phonetic Chinese writing system causes a unique situation where the modern pronunciation of the classical language is far more divergent (and heterogeneous, depending on the native – not necessarily Chinese – tongue of the reader) than in analogous cases, complicating understanding and study of Classical Chinese further compared to other classical languages.

Christian missionaries coined the term Wen-li (Chinese: 文理; pinyin: wénlǐ; Wade–Giles: wen-li) for Literary Chinese. Though composed from Chinese roots, this term was never used in that sense in Chinese, and was rejected by non-missionary sinologues



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